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J Funnell 1881 Newick  J Funnell (2nd)

Could anyone help locating these scenes?

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Could anyone help us date this photo (1) taken outside the Purley Arms, Brighton Road, South Croydon?

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SamplerThanks to Sarah Russell for sending this. The sampler was worked by Ruth Sparks and owned by Winifred Louisa Funnell born 1897 in Hastings (died 1988 in Eastbourne)…

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denhams efunnell clock

Photo thanks to Nick Leaton

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Bert Funnell’s big swim

S.S. Aorangi c. 1907I found this story dated 20th August 1913, from a New Zealand newspaper, The Northern Advocate, published on the site “Papers Past”.
It relates Australian seaman Bert Funnell’s lucky escape from drowning when he was rescued from the ocean waters 3 hours after falling overboard from the S.S. Aorangi. Bert was from Stanmore, Sydney.

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From a newspaper clipping, probably Sussex Express, sent to me a couple of years ago, sorry I can’t be more precise on the source:
“STEPHEN Ziegler from Horam is writing up his family history.
His grandmother, it turned out, had six brothers who served in the Great War and remarkably they all came back, though two died later due to wounds.
His gran married Sydney Funnell in 1923…”

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Source: Jim Funnell’s Blog
Albums: Word Out and more.

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Turret clock by Edward Funnell, BrightonMore pictures of Edward Funnell’s work with this 3 train turret clock and a carriage clock respectively for sale in the U.K. and Australia.

If you own one of our ancestors timepieces, we would be pleased to show photos of it on the site.

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HMS TriumphVictor Ernest Funnell, born in 1892 in Hove, was the fourth of James Funnell and Naomi Packham of Chalvington’s eight children.
He joined the Royal Navy at 16½ and boarded the battleship “HMS Triumph” in August 1915. Three officers and 75 ratings died in it’s sinking.
Victor Ernest Funnell was one of them.

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At a time when climate change is becoming ever more preoccupying, researching family history once again allows to put things into perspective. An article in an 1853 edition of satirical magazine “Punch” relates a fictive “Thames steamer Captain Funnell’s” arguments during a meeting called to oppose Home Secretary, Lord Palmerston’s London smoke abatement act. An early insight into continuing public ignorance supported by industrial propaganda. For researchers, this site gives a very interesting environmental timeline.

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Ronald Spencer Funnell was born in 1894 in Totnes, Devon. After World War One, he married a Newquay lass, Phyllis Maud Cock, and after a spell in Croydon, they settled in her home town with their 3 children, the fourth being born at St Columb.
Ronald, who for many years ran the Post Office at Newquay, was also an author of local touring guides and notably, surfing manuels.
The British Surfing Musuem is urgently looking to contact his descendants.

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