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This is the story of four generations of Funnells and their contribution to the building of the “American way of life”. Henry Funnell and his wife, Mary Sargent, left Chiddingly against the wishes of their family and settled in Huntington on Long Island, New York where daily chores continued throughout the Civil War, World War […]

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The clock is quite massive, standing 22 inches (56 cms) high, completely original, a three train fusee gong clock with a pull-repeat chime and strike. Pulling the repeat cord strikes the quarter, half, quarter or full hour last struck. In those times when there was no electric or even gas lighting, this would be very handy in the dark…

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As mentioned in this article, in the 1830’s, like many others, the parish of Chiddingly was having a hard time feeding it’s poor. Someone came up with the idea of financing settlers to the “new world”. Thomas, his wife, Ann and their 9 children settled in Ontario, Canada, a land which offered them many more opportunities than the parish ever could.

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You can find it here and you can search it using CTRL+f or the dedicated site search tool. It contains a 150 years of UK state registered Funnell wills and administrations from 1858 onwards.

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In his book « My Own Brand » published in 1980 (1), the Canadian politician Jack Horner (1927-2004) writes of his wife Leola (née Funnell) and her father, Arthur, who was shipped to Canada, to further the economic interests of the British Empire by working in a pioneer family. This was not an isolated case, […]

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James was born in 1822 in Barcombe (near Lewes, East Sussex), son of William Funnell and Catherine “Kitty” Locke. The seventh of nine children. Like six of his brothers and sisters, he was christened at the local church, St Mary the Virgin, on the 24th of March 1822. No doubt, he cried before his godparents […]

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I’ve added a new page of present day Funnell websites. It’s classed by forename initials. You can see it here. Just click on the letter and the list of sites will unroll.

If you are a Funnell, or have a Funnell related website, and would like to add it to the directory, just use the comments form or send me line via the Contact page. There is no charge, no ads, no hassle. A return link is appreciated but not required.

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I recently came across this wonderful website and immediately entered the wood in search of a very rare species, my great grandmother, Birdie Mary Funnell. Birdie Mary married my great grandfather, Henry William Stagg, on 1st May 1880 at St Simon’s Church, Southsea. Their marriage certificate gives her age as 19, a spinster. Her father […]

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The Sussex Record Society (1) offers us a transcription of one of the earliest Funnell documents, a will. On the 16th of April 1553 (proved 29th April 1553), John Funnell of Grenley, Westham bequeathed his body to be buried in the Churchyard of Westham, a barrel of beer and as much bread as can be […]

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Whilst researching, I stumbled on this Internet book which describes rural Sussex life in Chiddingly in the early 1800s. Not surprisingly, Funnells are mentionned several times as in this passage I’ve extracted to whet your appetite. I found the book captivating and read it from end to end. Thomas Funnell can be found in the […]

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In the first half of the 19th century, the railways were pushing the industrial revolution into the farthest reaches of the country. Until then, timekeeping had been left to the skies. The necessity for trains to run on time forced England into the modern age and a unique time zone. The whole country became punctual […]

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Mildred Clarice Funnell was born in Honeyeye Falls, New York in 1901, daughter of Alfred Jennings Funnell and Louella Yates. Her father was born in East Varick soon after his parents arrived in New York from England. He was a Presbyterian Minister ordained in 1898. Chaplain with Ohio’s National Guard in 1916, he served in […]

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